Culture

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"Mormons have repeated in a deep sense the pattern of the Jews—they are a religion that has become a people." -Harold Bloom, The American Religion

Anyone who has been to Utah or been around Mormons will eventually notice that Mormonism is in fact it's own culture. With this view in mind, any culture deserves special attention. In general, missionaries who desire to enter into a culture take time to understand and learn how to live within that culture and seek to understand how to be most effective within it. Little is different with Mormonism. The historical trek with Brigham Young to Utah is just one example of convictions and aspects that are deeply embedded in the Mormon culture.

Contents

[edit] A distinct, homogeneous culture

"Mormonism is a homogeneous culture. To be exact, it is a religious subculture that was born in America, flourished in America and concludes in America." [1]
"Essentially, the Mormon message attracts people who want to become Americanized." -D. Michael Quinn [2]
"What is often underestimated is how the Mormons who followed Brigham Young west also created a powerfully unique and distinctive culture. Mormonism leaves an indelible cultural imprint on those who grow up in the tradition. That cultural imprint is so deeply imbedded that some researchers believe Mormons are an ethnic group... [T]here are... many who have abandoned religious Mormonism but remain culturally Mormon." [3]
"Mormons have managed to make themselves into an ethnic group without any of the usual markers of ethnicity—no distinctive language or accent, no special foods or music." [4]

[edit] Family

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[edit] Atheological tendency

Many have argued that the primary "glue" of Mormonism is the heritage, culture, and family ties, not the theology.
A key to understanding Mormon people is recognizing their atheological tendency to ignore incoherence and to focus on more accessible, social aspects of their religion. Many have argued that the primary "glue" of Mormonism is the heritage, culture, and family ties, not the theology. In other words, the typical allegiance to the Mormon organization primarily stems from something other than doctrinal concerns.
See main page: Atheological tendency

[edit] Postmodernism

Some aspects of historic Mormonism make it fit very well with postmodernism, and contemporary Mormonism is heavily influenced by the trend as a whole. Mormons tend to be very skeptical over knowing objective meaning and authorial intent in text, especially religious text, and view criticism of anyone's beliefs (especially their own) as deeply unethical. Unfortunately for Christian evangelists, Mormons also view authoritative proclamation of one's own worldview, as though it were absolutely true, as deeply unethical, and view means of communication which are distinctively connected to authoritative views of truth as inappropriate and "contentious".

See main page: Postmodernism

[edit] Internal stereotypes

[edit] Ex-Mormons

"This typical, non-Mormon stereotype, is another way that Mormons are able to support thier beleifs. If you have fallen away from the church, it is because you don't want to give your time to God and would rather spend that time on more worldly pursuits." [5]

"I often view those who stop attending, or leave the church, claiming that it was the anti-Mormon literature that made them do it are just looking for an excuse." [6]

[edit] Anti-Mormons

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See main page: Anti-Mormon

[edit] Population and growth rate

Latter-day Saints as a percentage of state populations, 1990. (Glenmary)

Mormons pride themselves in the idea that their religion is the "fastest-growing religious element in the United States and in the world, almost" [1]

See main page: Population and growth rate

[edit] Missions

Most boys are brought up with the expectation that they will serve a 2-year mission.

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See main page: Missions

[edit] Notable customs

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[edit] References

  1. Gordon B. Hinckley, The New Yorker, "Lives of the Saints" (2002). Accessed 8/19/2006. URL: http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/?020121fa_FACT1

[edit] See also

[edit] External links

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